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Holi & Bhang Restaurant & Takeaway Durham


"Authentic and exotic Indian flavours with a Western connection -- where East meets West"
Order food online from Holi And Bhang! It's easy to use, fast and convenient. The online takeaway service contains our entire takeaway menu. Order now Our online service is currently collection-only and is 15% off for all orders.

Takeaway opening times

Sunday-Thursday: 5pm-10pm
Friday-Saturday: 5pm-10:30pm

We are now open for 7 days a week for in house dining in our Restaurant and Takeaway Service from 5pm till 10.30pm. (Last orders are at 9.30 pm)
Please refer to our COVID-19 section and click the link below on how we are operating safely with our customers and staff.
COVID-19
All Table reservations MUST be booked in advanced by calling us on 0191 3844455
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Restaurant Launch opening night
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A little about Holi

The festival of love and joy

Holi is the Hindu “festival of colours” or “festival of love” which generally falls on a full moon in March. Celebrated in Spring, to mark the end of winter and commemorate nature’s spring beauty with a good harvest that symbolises prosperity and happiness, and to play and laugh, forget and forgive, and repair broken relationships.

Holi is a two-day festival and begins the night before the main festival with choti (small) Holi, where a large bonfire is lit on the streets as a symbol of Holika Dahan (burning of the demoness Holika) symbolic to celebrating the victory of good over evil.

There are many legends given as to the reasons for celebrating Holi, the most well-known one is that of King Hiranyakashyapu and his son Prahlad.

Prahlad's devotion to God (Vishnu) enraged his father. He asked his sister Holika, who was immune to fire, to sit in a fire taking Prahlad in her lap.

Prahlad, who was blessed by God, was saved and Holika was burnt to ashes. This gave birth to the festival of Holi.

Holi celebrations begin the morning after the Holika bonfire. There is no tradition of holding prayer, and the day is for partying and pure enjoyment. Children and young people form groups armed with dry colours, coloured solution and water gun, water balloons filled with coloured water, and other creative means to colour their targets.

Everyone in open areas such as streets and parks are game, but inside homes or at doorways only dry powder is used to smear each other's face. People throw colours and get their targets completely coloured up. It is like a water fight, but with coloured water. People take delight in spraying coloured water on each other. By late morning, everyone looks like a canvas of colours. This is why Holi is given the name "Festival of Colours".

Groups sing and dance, some playing drums with plenty of traditional delicacies of food, including the famous bhang drink (made from cannabis) consumed by adults.

Holi is now celebrated all over the world to bring joy, life, happiness and togetherness.

Allergy Information

Menu items may contain or come into contact with allergens including but not limited to WHEAT, EGGS, MILK, FISH, SEAFOOD or NUTS.

For full allergy information, please contact Holi & Bhang directly:
TEL: 0191 384 4455